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Birmingham, St James the Less, Ashted 8 Tubular Bells

Grid Reference 139/083876 Ashted Church - Source: Pudding
Postcode B7 4EP
Other Information About the church 

History

The church was founded in 1789 when a house built in 1777 for Dr. John Ash, the founder of the General Hospital, was converted into a chapel. It was consecrated in 1810 and became a separate parish from Aston in 1853. It was altered several times, including the building of the tower some time in the mid 19th century.  It was restored in 1887/8 and in 1891 a set of 8 tubular bells was installed at a cost of £400.

The church was badly damaged during in an air raid in November 1940. The Bishop issued an order deferring restoration on 11 October 1945, and the building lay in ruins until subsequently demolished in about 1956. 

(Most of the above information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

8 tubular bells by Harrison, Latham & Co, Coventry

Photo Gallery

ashted2.jpg
The Ruined Church

 

ERDINGTON – Sir Josiah Mason’s Orphanage 5, 14-2-3 in F (Demolished)

Grid Reference c139/112921

History 

This is a lost clock chime. The orphanage was founded in 1862 by Josiah Mason (1795-1881), the Birmingham pen manufacturer and philanthropist, offering a refuge for poor children of the district. When completed the orphanage was a large three-storey building in red brick with two towers, one in the middle of the entrance front and one on the west side. On his death in 1881 Mason, who was knighted in 1872 for his charitable work, was buried in the chapel.

The first set of clock and bells was not satisfactory and a new, heavier set was cast and a large clock provided. They struck the "Westminster or "Cambridge" chimes and are the equivalent 1, 2, 3, 6 & 10 of a ring of 10.

The orphanage was closed in 1963 and demolished the following year. The weights below are those provided by Taylors who scrapped them.

(Most of the above information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

1 William Blews & Sons, Birmingham  1871   3-3-12  26.50"   1348Hz (E+38c)
2 William Blews & Sons, Birmingham  1871   4-0-18  27.625"  1188Hz (D+20c)
3 William Blews & Sons, Birmingham  1871   4-2-04  29.375"  1070Hz (C+38c)
4 William Blews & Sons, Birmingham  1871   9-3-16  38.25"    802Hz (G+39c)
5 William Blews & Sons, Birmingham  1871  14-2-03  43.125"   701Hz (F+6c)

 Photo Gallery

Erdington Orphanage - Source: Phyllis Nicklin
The Orphanage

SMETHWICK*, St Paul, West Smethwick 8, 3-1-18 in E

Grid Reference 139/011891 (approx) West Smeithwick Church - Source: Flickr  
Postcode B67 7LX
Date Lost c.1996 

History

The church, then in Staffordshire, was built in 1857/8. It was a gothic building in white Stourbridge brick with Bath stone dressings, with a tower and spire over the porch at the NW angle. The original church was destroyed by fire on 3 February 1963, but the tower and bells were unharmed. It was afterwards rebuilt on a reduced scale within the ruined shell of the old church, with the steeple remaining at the entrance to the site.

Following the closure of the church the bells were removed from the tower in November 1993. They have since been rehung as a light ring of eight at Holy Trinity, Clifton, in Nottinghamshire, installation being completed towards the end of 1999. The clavier is now preserved in a display of materials about bells and ringing at the Swan Bell Tower in Perth, Western Australia. The church was declared redundant in 1994 and demolished in 1996-7.

Originally there were three bells in the tower, but only one remained when a chime of 8 was put in the tower in 1923/4. Gilletts won the contract to supply a light chime of bells, intended intially as 6 bells to form 3-8 of a 12. The contract was changed to a chime of 8, with the clavier fitted out for 4 tenors, (largest 8½cwt) and an extra semitone bell, which would be the natural to the now sharp 2nd. These bells were never provided. Cast in the middle of 1924, the bells were in the key of E natural (1336Hz or E plus 22.81 cents).

Details of the Bells

1 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  0-2-08  13.50"   2672.0Hz (E+23c)
2 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  0-2-22  14.625"  2528.0Hz (D#+27c)
3 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  0-3-18  16.00"   2256.0Hz (C#+30c)
4 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  1-0-01  17.125"  2008.0Hz (B+28c)
5 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  1-1-17  18.875"  1792.0Hz (A+31c)
6 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  1-2-21  20.00"   1688.0Hz (G#+28c)
7 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  2-0-24  21.875"  1512.0Hz (F#+37c)
8 Gillett & Johnston, Croydon  1924  3-1-18  25.50"   1336.0Hz (E+23c)

Photo Gallery

None Available 

Birmingham, All Saints, Hockley 8, 6-1-21 in C

Grid Reference   139/054882 Hockley Church. Source: ahistoryofbirminghamchurches.jimdo.com
Postocode B18 7RP
Date Lost 1973

History

The church was built in 1832-3. It has no tower, but the four main corners of the building originally carried tall pinacled turrets, later removed.  The chancel was rebuilt and enlarged in 1881.

Originally there was only one bell, in the south west turret. It was cast by Thomas Mears in 1832 and was 27.375" in diamter, weighing 3-3-9.  This was sold to Taylors in 1862 when they supplied a new bell via Blews; 28.52", 4-2-27. This was recast quickly as the bell later removed was by Barwell, 1875 - 24", 3cwt. It was present, but disused, in 1963 and was there until the demolision of the church.

The vicar presented a chime of bells in memory of his sister and his nephew. The bells were put in an open steel framework above the roof, behind the gable - the one seen level with the spirelets. The part of the building beyond this level was removed some time before the rest of the church as a later photograph shows a shorter church, but with a similar set of three windows.

The church was closed in 1972 and declared redundant on 3rd April 1973. Demolition and disposal of contents was authorised on 18th December 1973. The 19th century housing in the area were being demolished and the dwindling congregation could not afford the costs of the required repairs to the church.

The bells were rescued from the now redundant church on the eve of its demolition are now installed in Harborne, St Faith and St Laurence (q.v.). The turret bell was taken to Bishop Latimer's Church, whose parish now includes the Hockley area

(Most of the above information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

1 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  0-3-27  16.00"   2068.0Hz
2 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  1-0-15  16.875"  1958.0Hz
3 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  1-2-10  19.00"   1743.0Hz
4 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  2-0-08  21.00"   1552.0Hz
5 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  2-2-21  23.00"   1383.0Hz
6 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  3-0-10  24.375"  1306.0Hz
7 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  4-3-03  27.625"  1164.0Hz
8 John Taylor & Co, Loughborough  1929  6-1-21  30.625"  1037.0Hz

Photo Gallery

None Available

WYTHALL*, St Mary 8 Tubular Bells in C

Grid Reference 139/072748 Wythall Church - Source: Genuki
Post Code B47 6JA
Othe Information New Church Website

History

This church is historically in Worcestershire. The present church was built in 1860-2 by Frederick Preedy to replace a small brick church of 1777, which had in turn replaced an earlier building. It was consecrated on Monday 11th August 1862 in a service starting at 11.00am and continuing to 2.00pm!

There was a central tower in the original plans, but it was not until 1907-8 that it was built, at the expense of the Misses Mynors as a memorial to their parents. The plans were prepared by Mr. W. H. Bidlalke. MA.. of 37 Waterloo Sinreet. Birmingham. and the contractor for the work was Mr. Harvey Gibbs of Kings Heath. The 8 tubular bells were hung by Messrs. Harrington Latham and Co. and the stone work was executed by Mr. David French of Kings Heath.  The bells were hung in a tall wooden frame in two rows of four, with bells 1,3,5,7 on one side and 2,4,6,8 on the other. They were struck by hammers and played from a manual in a lower floor in the tower.

The church was closed some time before 1988 due to concerns about its condition. It was declared redundant in 1992 and converted into offices early this century after years of neglect.

There was a conventional bell, 2½cwt, diameter 22.875" cast by Matthew Bagley in 1689 that was hung for ringing. This had come from Kings Norton church, St Mary's being a daughter church to it. It has been returned to its original home.

Details of the Bells

1  60.25"
2  62.00"
3  66.50"
4  70.50"
5  75.50"
6  77.50"
7  83.00"
8  91.75"

Photo Gallery

None Available 

 

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