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Birmingham, St James the Less, Ashted 8 Tubular Bells

Grid Reference 139/083876 Ashted Church - Source: Pudding
Postcode B7 4EP
Other Information About the church 

History

The church was founded in 1789 when a house built in 1777 for Dr. John Ash, the founder of the General Hospital, was converted into a chapel. It was consecrated in 1810 and became a separate parish from Aston in 1853. It was altered several times, including the building of the tower some time in the mid 19th century.  It was restored in 1887/8 and in 1891 a set of 8 tubular bells was installed at a cost of £400.

The church was badly damaged during in an air raid in November 1940. The Bishop issued an order deferring restoration on 11 October 1945, and the building lay in ruins until subsequently demolished in about 1956. 

(Most of the above information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

8 tubular bells by Harrison, Latham & Co, Coventry

Photo Gallery

ashted2.jpg
The Ruined Church

 

COVENTRY*, Christ Church 8 Tubular Bells 

Grid Reference 140/333787 Coventry Christ Church - Source: M Chester
ostcode CV1 2PL
Other Information New Church Website 

History

Christ Church was the first of the new churches that were built in Coventry in the early part of the 19th century to cater for the city's growing population.  It was built between 1829 and 1832, it being dedicated on 3rd August 1832.  It was built to incorporate the fourteenth century tower of Greyfriars. It was initially a chapel of ease to St Michael's, now the cathedral, and was not a parish church until 1900. The church was destroyed in an air-raid on 10-11 April 1941.  The church was demolished after the war, again leaving just the tower standing.

It was decided not to rebuild the church in the city centre, but to build a new one in the suburbs. This was done and a tower was provided and an 8-bell frame installed in this new church for a ring with a tenor of about 10cwt. Alas, it was never filled and was eventually sold and used in the augmentation scheme at Radford Semele (q.v.) The website for this new church shows the shattered bell in its history page

One bell was provided for the church by Taylors of Oxford in 1831 - weighing 3-2-11.  It was hung for ringing, it being rehung by Taylors in 1910.  A set of tubular bells was installed in the tower in December 1892, made by Harrington, Latham & Co of Coventry. They were first heard on Christmas Day.  Within about 30 years they had been removed.

(Most of this information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

8 Tubular bells

Photo Gallery

None Available

Water  Orton*, St Peter & St Paul 8 Tubular Bells 

Grid Reference 139/177910 Water Orton Church - Source: britishlistedbuildings.co.uk
Postcode B46 1QU
Date Lost c.1955
Other Information Church Website 

Grid Reference

History

This church was originally a chapelry in the parish Aston, become a parish in its own right in 1871. The church itself became too small and a new church was built in 1878/9 at which time a North-West porch tower and spire (which was removed 1987) was provided. The old church was demolished in 1887

There were two bells in the old church. The larger of these was sent to Minworth when that church was built in 1909.  The remaining bell, by Joseph Smith of Edgbaston, (16.25", 1cwt in B)  his now hung for lever chiming in an Nineteenth Century frame for two bells.

Above the bell-frame are the remains of the framework for a set of 8 tubular bells.  These were purchased from Erdington Parish Church (q.v.) when they installed a ring of bells in 1904. They were removed some time after 1955, as they were still in place when repairs were contemplated at this time.

Details of the Bells

8 Tubular bells

Photo Gallery

 None Available

COVENTRY*, St Osburg (RC) 8 Tubular Bells 

Grid Reference 140/327793 Coventry St Osburg Church - Source: A MacRae Thompson
Postcde CV1 4AP
Other Information Church Website


History

This church was built in Upper Hill Street between 1843-5 in order to cope with the rapidly expanding Catholic population of Coventry.  It has a handsome tower and spire at the South-West of the church.  The body of the church was badly damaged by bombing on the night of "The Coventry Blitz", 14-15 November 1940.  It was repaired enough for services to recommence by April 1944, but was not fully refurbished until 1952.

The tower contains a bell by J Murphy of Dublin, which was cast in 1851, weighing about 13¾cwt.  This was originally hung for ringing, though it has been sounded by means of a rope being tied to the clapper for many years.  It seems likely that it has not been swung since around 1890 when a set of tubular bells from the local factory of Harrington, Latham & Co was installed.  The tubes have long gone, but the chiming manual remains in place in the room below the bell chamber and the remains of the wooden framework for the tubes remains above the frame for the bell.  It is not known exactly when the tubes were installed and removed.

(Most of this information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford)

Details of the Bells

8 Tubular bells

Photo Gallery

None Available 

HANDSWORTH, St Michael 8 Tubular Bells

Grid Reference 139/052891 Handsowrth St Michael Church - Source: handsworthhisotry.co.uk
Postcode BL18 5LB
Date Lost 1965
Additional Information Chuch Website 

History

This church is in St.Michael’s Road, off Soho Hill. The church was built, originally as a chapel of ease to Handsworth Parish Church. There is a tower, added in 1866, and spire at the south-west corner and a turret between the south aisle and the chancel that once held a small bell.

The first stone for St. Michael's was laid in 1852 by Lord Dartmouth, then living at Sandwell Hall. The architect was a local man, Mr Bourne from Dudley, and the church took three years to complete on land which had been purchased from the estate of Matthew Boulton. The church was consecrated in 1855 by the Bishop of Lichfield. It was a somewhat controversial church at the time in that it was very much a "high" church. In December 1888, the "Weekly Post" noted the arrival of the new Vicar, the Reverend H Oswell, "the new Vicar is likely to be favourable with lovers of ritual, and be regarded with aversion by those who suffer from the dread of what they call 'ecclesiastical mummery'. The new vicar is profuse in making the sign of the cross, and a long list of services is read out on a Sunday morning which is quite appalling in its length". Equally controversial, was the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in a "secret chapel" hidden from view in the south porch.

In 1888 a set of eight tubular bells was placed in the tower, installed by Harrington, Latham & Co of Coventry, these bells cost £100. They were in the key of A flat, the biggest bell being 7'5" long and 3¼” in diameter. The tubular bells were rehung and repaired in 1946 by William Potts & Sons of Leeds, clockmakers, in memory of three parishioners who lost their lives in World War II. Seven of them were sold to a scrap metal merchant in about 1965, and the remaining one was subsequently stolen.

(Most of the above information is quoted directly (with permission) from the research notes of Chris Pickford).

Details of the Bells

8 Tubular bells

Photo Gallery

None Available 

 

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